MA Accepted Material Test, Covid-19 Vaccine Mandatory Halal for Muslims

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1NEWS, The Supreme Court (MA) has decided that the Covid-19 vaccine for Muslims in the country must be halal.

The government must fulfill this obligation after the Indonesian Muslim Consumer Foundation (YKMI) as the applicant won at the Supreme Court level against President Joko Widodo (Jokowi).

The Supreme Court’s decision is the result of judicial review or judicial review of Presidential Regulation (Perpres) Number 99/2020 regarding vaccine procurement proposed by YKMI.

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The Supreme Court in a copy of its decision explained that the government cannot immediately impose its will on Indonesian citizens to be vaccinated for any reason and without conditions.

“That the government in carrying out the Covid-19 vaccination program in the territory of the Republic of Indonesia, cannot immediately impose its will on citizens to be vaccinated for any reason and without conditions, except for the protection and guarantee of the halalness of the Covid-19 vaccine which is stipulated , especially against Muslims,” ​​reads the Supreme Court’s decision.

The government’s action to determine the type of vaccine that is not yet halal to the public, especially Muslims, based on the sound of the copy of the Supreme Court, is clearly contrary to the provisions of Article 4 of Law Number 33 of 2014 concerning Guaranteed Halal Products.

With this condition, it shows that the government is inconsistent in determining the type of vaccine for the implementation of vaccination for the community, especially against Muslims.

“The guarantee of the right to freedom of religion and worship in the Indonesian legal state, apart from being guaranteed in the Preamble and Body of the 1945 Constitution of the Republic of Indonesia, is also regulated in various laws and regulations. The guarantee of freedom of religion and worship is further regulated in Law Number 39 of 1999 concerning Human Rights which is based on the MPR Decree Number XVII/MPR/1998 concerning the Indonesian Nation’s View of Life on Human Rights and the Human Rights Charter,” he explained.

This, based on the Supreme Court’s decision, is regulated in the right to freedom of religion and worship, which is a non-derogable right, meaning that the state cannot reduce its fulfillment under any circumstances.

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